Commander X and EquifaX and Myth of the Russian HaX Show Notes 20170920

Commander X and EquifaX and Myth of the Russian HaX

Gold Price is: $1303.00

Silver Price is: $ 17.43

Bitcoin is: $ 3960.00

Euro is: $ 1.19

Earthquakes of Mexico will have a bunch of aftershocks for probably weeks! Be careful.

How Childhood Trauma Could Be Mistaken for ADHD

Some experts say the normal effects of severe adversity may be misdiagnosed as ADHD.

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/07/how-childhood-trauma-could-be-mistaken-for-adhd/373328/

Dr. Nicole Brown’s quest to understand her misbehaving pediatric patients began with a hunch.

Brown was completing her residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, when she realized that many of her low-income patients had been diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

These children lived in households and neighborhoods where violence and relentless stress prevailed. Their parents found them hard to manage and teachers described them as disruptive or inattentive. Brown knew these behaviors as classic symptoms of ADHD, a brain disorder characterized by impulsivity, hyperactivity, and an inability to focus.

When Brown looked closely, though, she saw something else: trauma. Hyper-vigilance and dissociation, for example, could be mistaken for inattention. Impulsivity might be brought on by a stress response in overdrive.

Despite our best efforts in referring them to behavioral therapy and starting them on stimulants, it was hard to get the symptoms under control,” she said of treating her patients according to guidelines for ADHD. “I began hypothesizing that perhaps a lot of what we were seeing was more externalizing behavior as a result of family dysfunction or other traumatic experience.”

Dr. Nicole Brown’s quest to understand her misbehaving pediatric patients began with a hunch.

Brown was completing her residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, when she realized that many of her low-income patients had been diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

These children lived in households and neighborhoods where violence and relentless stress prevailed. Their parents found them hard to manage and teachers described them as disruptive or inattentive. Brown knew these behaviors as classic symptoms of ADHD, a brain disorder characterized by impulsivity, hyperactivity, and an inability to focus.

When Brown looked closely, though, she saw something else: trauma. Hyper-vigilance and dissociation, for example, could be mistaken for inattention. Impulsivity might be brought on by a stress response in overdrive.

Despite our best efforts in referring them to behavioral therapy and starting them on stimulants, it was hard to get the symptoms under control,” she said of treating her patients according to guidelines for ADHD. “I began hypothesizing that perhaps a lot of what we were seeing was more externalizing behavior as a result of family dysfunction or other traumatic experience.”

Considered a heritable brain disorder, one in nine U.S. children—or 6.4 million youth—currently have a diagnosis of ADHD. In recent years, parents and experts have questioned whether the growing prevalence of ADHD has to do with hasty medical evaluations, a flood of advertising for ADHD drugs, and increased pressure on teachers to cultivate high-performing students. Now Brown and other researchers are drawing attention to a compelling possibility: Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive behavior may in fact mirror the effects of adversity, and many pediatricians, psychiatrists, and psychologists don’t know how—or don’t have the time—to tell the difference.

Though ADHD has been aggressively studied, few researchers have explored the overlap between its symptoms and the effects of chronic stress or experiencing trauma like maltreatment, abuse and violence. To test her hypothesis beyond Baltimore, Brown analyzed the results of a national survey about the health and well-being of more than 65,000 children.

Brown’s findings, which she presented in May at an annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies, revealed that children diagnosed with ADHD also experienced markedly higher levels of poverty, divorce, violence, and family substance abuse. Those who endured four or more adverse childhood events were three times more likely to use ADHD medication.

Interpreting these results is tricky. All of the children may have been correctly diagnosed with ADHD, though that is unlikely. Some researchers argue that the difficulty of parenting a child with behavioral issues might lead to economic hardship, divorce, and even physical abuse. This is particularly true for parents who themselves have ADHD, similar impulsive behavior or their own history of childhood maltreatment. There is also no convincing evidence that trauma or chronic stress lead to the development of ADHD.

For Brown, who is now a pediatrician at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, the data are cautionary. It’s not evident how trauma influences ADHD diagnosis and management, but it’s clear that some misbehaving children might be experiencing harm that no stimulant can fix. These children may also legitimately have ADHD, but unless prior or ongoing emotional damage is treated, it may be difficult to see dramatic improvement in the child’s behavior.

We need to think more carefully about screening for trauma and designing a more trauma-informed treatment plan,” Brown says.

Dr. Kate Szymanski came to the same conclusion a few years ago. An associate professor at Adelphi University’s Derner Institute and an expert in trauma, Szymanski analyzed data from a children’s psychiatric hospital in New York. A majority of the 63 patients in her sample had been physically abused and lived in foster homes. On average, they reported three traumas in their short lives. Yet, only eight percent of the children had received a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder while a third had ADHD.

I was struck by the confusion or over-eagerness–or both–to take one diagnosis over another,” Szymanski says. “To get a picture of trauma from a child is much harder than looking at behavior like impulsivity, hyperactivity. And if they cluster in a certain way, then it’s easy to go to a conclusion that it’s ADHD.”

A previous edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders urged clinicians to distinguish between ADHD symptoms and difficulty with goal-directed behavior in children from “inadequate, disorganized or chaotic environments,” but that caveat does not appear in the latest version. Unearthing details about a child’s home life can also be challenging, Szymanski says.

It’s not clear how many children are misdiagnosed with ADHD annually, but the number could be nearly 1 million.

A child may withhold abuse or neglect to protect his family or, having normalized that experience, never mention it all. Clinicians may also underestimate the prevalence of adversity. The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, a years-long survey of more than 17,000 adults, found that two-thirds of participants reported at least one of 10 types of abuse, neglect, or household dysfunction. Twelve percent reported four or more. That list isn’t exhaustive, either. The study didn’t include homelessness and foster care placement, for example, and the DSM doesn’t easily classify those events as “traumatic.”

It’s not clear how many children are misdiagnosed with ADHD annually, but a study published in 2010 estimated the number could be nearly 1 million. That research compared the diagnosis rate amongst 12,000 of the youngest and oldest children in a kindergarten sample and found that the less mature students were 60 percent more likely to receive an ADHD diagnosis.

Though ADHD is thought to be a genetic condition, or perhaps associated with lead or prenatal alcohol and cigarette exposure, there is no brain scan or DNA test that can give a definitive diagnosis. Instead, clinicians are supposed to follow exhaustive guidelines set forth by professional organizations, using personal and reported observations of a child’s behavior to make a diagnosis. Yet, under financial pressure to keep appointments brief and billable, pediatricians and therapists aren’t always thorough.

In our 15-minute visits—maybe 30 minutes at the most—we don’t really have the time to go deeper,” Brown says. If she suspects ADHD or a psychological condition, Brown will refer her patient to a mental health professional for a comprehensive evaluation. “You may have had this social history that you took in the beginning, but unless the parent opens up and shares more about what’s going on in the home, we often don’t have the opportunity or think to connect the two.”

Caelan Kuban, a psychologist and director of the Michigan-based National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children, knows the perils of this gap well. Four years ago she began offering a course designed to teach educators, social service workers and other professionals how to distinguish the signs of trauma from those of ADHD.

It’s very overwhelming, very frustrating,” she says. “When I train, the first thing I tell people is you may walk away being more confused than you are right now.”

In the daylong seminar, Kuban describes how traumatized children often find it difficult to control their behavior and rapidly shift from one mood to the next. They might drift into a dissociative state while reliving a horrifying memory or lose focus while anticipating the next violation of their safety. To a well-meaning teacher or clinician, this distracted and sometimes disruptive behavior can look a lot like ADHD.

Kuban urges students in her course to abandon the persona of the “all-knowing clinician” and instead adopt the perspective of the “really curious practitioner.”

Rather than ask what is wrong with a child, Kuban suggests inquiring about what happened in his or her life, probing for life-altering events.

Jean West, a social worker employed by the school district in Joseph, Missouri, took Kuban’s course a few years ago. She noticed that pregnant teen mothers and homeless students participating in district programs were frequently diagnosed with ADHD. This isn’t entirely unexpected: Studies have shown that ADHD can be more prevalent among low-income youth, and that children and adolescents with the disorder are more prone to high-risk behavior. Yet, West felt the students’ experiences might also explain conduct easily mistaken for ADHD.

Kuban’s course convinced West to first consider the role of trauma in a student’s life. “What has been the impact? What kind of family and societal support have they had?” West asks. “If we can work on that level and truly know their story, there’s so much power in that.”

As a school official, West sometimes refers troubled students to a pediatrician or psychiatrist for diagnosis, and meets with parents to describe how and why adversity might shape their child’s behavior. In her private practice, West regularly assesses patients for post-traumatic stress disorder instead of, or in addition to, ADHD.

Though stimulant medications help ADHD patients by increasing levels of neurotransmitters in the brain associated with pleasure, movement, and attention, some clinicians worry about how they affect a child with PTSD, or a similar anxiety disorder, who already feels hyper-vigilant or agitated. The available behavioral therapies for ADHD focus on time management and organizational skills, and aren’t designed to treat emotional and psychological turmoil.

Instead, West teaches a traumatized child how to cope with and defuse fear and anxiety. She also recommends training and therapy for parents who may be contributing to or compounding their child’s unhealthy behavior. Such programs can help parents reduce their use of harsh or abusive discipline while improving trust and communication, and have been shown to decrease disruptive child behavior.

Szymanski uses a similar approach with patients and their parents. “I think any traumatized child needs individual therapy but also family therapy,” she says. “Trauma is a family experience; it never occurs in a vacuum.”

Yet finding a provider who is familiar with such therapy can be difficult for pediatricians and psychiatrists, Szymanski says. Though some hospitals have centers for childhood trauma, there isn’t a well-defined referral network. Even then, insurance companies, including the federal Medicaid program, may not always pay for the group sessions commonly used in parent training programs.

Faced with such complicated choices, Szymanski says it’s no surprise when clinicians overlook the role of trauma in a child’s behavior and focus on ADHD instead.

Inattentive and hyperactive behavior can be traced back to any number of conditions—just like chest pains don’t have the same origin in every patient.

While there are few recommendations now for clinicians, that will likely change in the coming years. The American Academy of Pediatrics is currently developing new guidance on ADHD that will include a section on assessing trauma in patients, though it won’t be completed until 2016.

Dr. Heather Forkey, a pediatrician at University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, who specializes in treating foster children, is assisting the AAP. Her goal is to remind doctors that inattentive and hyperactive behavior can be traced back to any number of conditions—just like chest pains don’t have the same origin in every patient. Ideally, the AAP will offer pediatricians recommendations for screening tools that efficiently gauge adversity in a child’s life. That practice, she says, should come before any diagnosis of ADHD.

When speaking to traumatized children inappropriately diagnosed with ADHD, she offers them a reassuring explanation of their behavior. The body’s stress system, she says, developed long ago in response to life-or-death threats like a predatory tiger. The part of the brain that controls impulses, for example, shuts off so that survival instincts can prevail.

What does that look like when you put that kid in a classroom?” Forkey asks. “When people don’t understand there’s been a tiger in your life, it looks a lot like ADHD to them.”

Two FEMA barges capable of housing hundreds of Hurricane Harvey evacuees are heading to Port Arthur, Texas

http://www.ktiv.com/story/36368524/2017/09/Thursday/two-fema-barges-capable-of-housing-hundreds-of-hurricane-harvey-evacuees-are-heading-to-port-arthur-texas

Not everyone is happy with the news.

Gwendolyn Donahue, a displaced resident who is currently staying at a Red Cross shelter, doesn’t like the idea of living on one of the boats.

She was rescued from her home during Harvey then transported from shelter to shelter. She said the last thing she wants to do is live on a barge on the water.

“I will say again, I’m not a fish, I’m not a crab, and I’m not a shrimp because I don’t know nothing about being on a boat,” said Donahue.

County Judge Jeff Branick said FEMA and the “Texas Division of Emergency Management” are looking at other options for temporary housing such as mobile homes, trailers and shelters.

Patricia Mooney, another evacuated resident said she would not mind living on a barge.

“It’s a nice place to regroup, get yourself together you know, give it a try you don’t know until you try,” said Mooney.

Port Arthur Mayor clarified temporary housing situation for city

http://www.12newsnow.com/weather/harvey/fema-barges-expected-to-arrive-in-port-arthur-in-two-days-1/474654913

PORT ARTHUR – Mayor Derrick Freeman posted a clarification to the temporary housing situation regarding to the FEMA barges coming to Port Arthur.

There will be two FEMA barges which will hold 300 people each in the port of Port Arthur.

Mayor Freeman posted this picture on his Facebook clarifying about the barges that will be use to house displaced residents.

Gwendolyn Donahue, a displaced resident who is currently staying at the Red Cross shelter at Thomas Jefferson Middle School is not happy with this type of temporary housing.

“To live from shelter to shelter is hard enough, but at this moment now you are talking about putting me on a barge a ship, what you put out a cargo of food to ship around and now you’re talking about this is how I have to live,” said Donahue.

She was rescued from her home during Harvey then transported from shelter to shelter. She said the last thing she wants to do is live on a Barge on the water.

“I will say again, I’m not a fish, I’m not a crab, and I’m not a shrimp because I don’t know nothing about being on a boat,” said Donahue.

County Judge Jeff Branick said FEMA and the “Texas Division of Emergency Management” are looking at other options for temporary housing such as mobile homes, trailers and shelters.

Officials are also looking into contractors with the Sheltering and Temporary Essential Power program who will make repairs to damaged homes and could allow people to move back.

Patricia Mooney, another evacuated resident said she would not mind living on a barge.

“It’s a nice place to regroup, get yourself together you know, give it a try you don’t know until you try,” said Mooney.

Mayor Freeman said three meals a day will be offered at the barges along with laundry and satellite TV.

Officials are looking at different security options and are discussing the possibility of separating men and women on the barges.

Judge Branick said he believes a screening process will be in place to prevent sex offenders and criminals from staying on the barge.

This is what’s behind all those Elf on the Shelf memes

Have you heard of elf on the shelf?

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/Viral/this-is-whats-behind-all-those-elf-on-the-shelf-memes-36148114.html

Elf on the Shelf jokes online have officially taken over.

You know, the one that goes: “you’ve heard of Elf on the Shelf, now get ready for…” and then there’s a picture of one thing Photoshopped on top of something it rhymes with.

Like many memes, this one originated on Tumblr and was mostly Pokemon-themed.

Yes, that’s Ash in the trash.

But they’re not all immediately obvious, and some are harder than others.

That’ll be Eevee on the TV. You’re getting the hang of this!

But they’re not all Pokemon – other fictional universes are also getting involved.

It’s Bane on a plane.

And what’s a meme without Shrek making an appearance?

But what if you haven’t actually heard of Elf on the Shelf?

The Elf on the Shelf is a children’s story book and accompanying toy famous in the US, about an elf who, that’s right, sits on a shelf.

But it’s creepier than that. The elf in the book spies on kids and reports back to Father Christmas on their behaviour like some sort of festive morality spy.

And now there’s also a Hanukkah version – the Mensch on the Bench, made by a guy who pitched the idea on the American equivalent of Dragon’s Den.

So now you know.

US spies had info on India’s nuclear missiles years before launch – NSA leaks

https://www.rt.com/news/404008-india-nuclear-missile-us-nsa/

The NSA may have known about India’s nuclear-capable Sagarika and Dhanush missiles as early as 2005, newly released documents from the trove obtained by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveal.

US spies also likely possessed “significant intelligence” about the bombs in service in India during that period.

Those revelations come from the batch of 294 articles published by The Intercept last week, and traced back to the from National Security Agency’s Signal Intelligence Directorate internal newsletter, SIDtoday.

The papers were part of the trove of documents that was handed over to journalists by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden in 2013, in one of the largest leaks ever of US intelligence data.

One of the freshly released documents, titled “New collection access yields ‘spectacular’ intel,” has revealed US spying activities against India carried out by NSA sites abroad. It states that an NSA facility in Australia, codenamed RAINFALL, “had successfully geolocated signals of a suspected Indian nuclear weapons storage facility” in October 2004.

A Thailand-based “Foreign Satellite collection facility” codenamed LEMONWOOD then collaborated with NSA’s Unidentified Signal and Protocol Analysis Branch at NSA in “isolating these signals” and confirming their relation to the Indian nuclear weaponry. Additional equipment was than deployed to LEMONWOOD to “expand the modest collection.”

Immediately after fielding this equipment, collection of this new network began to provide what is being called ‘spectacular’ activity,” the document said.

According to the Intercept, this activity eventually allowed the US to obtain data about the Sagarika and Dhanush nuclear-capable missiles, years before they were test-fired by the Indian military.

Sagarika, a submarine-launched ballistic missile, has been in development since the 1990s. It was first successfully tested in 2008. The missile can be launched from both ground launchers and from underwater, and can carry a payload of up to 500 kilograms for a distance of up to 700 kilometers.

Dhanush, a sea-launched short-range ballistic missile, can carry the same payload of 500 kilograms up to a distance of 250 kilometers. It was first successfully test-fired in 2016, more than a decade after the NSA obtained information about the project.

According to the SIDtoday article cited by the Intercept, the NSA had also obtained information “on India’s possession of two different types of airdropped bombs.”

The first one was described in the paper as a “very large Fuel Air Explosive,” while the other one may have belonged to a “new generation of airdropped nuclear weapons.”

The Dizzying Number Of CFPB Complaints Against Equifax Since 2012 Should Infuriate You

The bureau’s database reveals more than 57,000 complaints against the credit-reporting firm since 2012, an average of about 31 a day.

https://www.fastcompany.com/40469235/the-dizzying-number-of-cfpb-complaints-against-equifax-since-2012-should-infuriate-you

Over the last 10 days, media coverage of the massive cyberattack against Equifax has uncovered a maddening spectacle of apparent negligence and incompetence at every step of the way. With each new detail—from the company’s delayed response to the incident to the recent resignation of two top-level executives hoping to escape the fallout—the chorus of lawmakers and consumer-rights groups demanding accountability gets louder and louder.

But Equifax’s shoddy security protocols and botched handling of sensitive private data probably haven’t come as much of a surprise to at least one group of Americans: They are the tens of thousands of consumers who have already lodged complaints against the company via the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. A search of the CFPB’s database reveals more than 57,000 complaints about Equifax dating back to 2012, when the database was first put online. That’s an average of about 31 a day.

As a sector, “credit reporting” is one of the most common reasons consumers turn to the CFPB for help. According to the bureau’s most recently published monthly complaint report, the sector ranked third among the top reasons people file complaints. Only “debt collection” and “mortgage” ranked higher.

And Equifax has the dubious distinction of being the worst of the worst. Over the last five years, the company has attracted more complaints than either of its two major rivals, though not substantially more. Experian had about 54,000 complaints against it while TransUnion had 49,000, according to a search I conducted on Sunday.

The sheer volume of complaints against all three companies are a reminder of why the credit-reporting industry remains so broadly reviled among American consumers. Read together, the complaints weave a narrative of collective hostility and resentment toward the massive entities who collect, store, and profit from our personal data but show little remorse or sympathy when that data is incorrect or misused.

BIG DATA, BAD DATA

In Equifax’s case, more than two thirds of the complaints are because of alleged incorrect information on a credit report. Consumers say they commonly find their reports contain information that is incomplete, outdated, doesn’t belong to them, or is just plain wrong. Many of those who complain say they are victims of fraud or identity theft, and some accuse Equifax of reinserting bad information even after it was previously deleted.

Another frequent reason consumers complain is because they believe their reports were improperly shared with other parties–a charge that feels less surprising in light of the recent hack.

Equifax did not respond to a request for comment. Worth noting is that the vast majority of complaints are marked as “closed with explanation.” According to the CFPB, that means the company took some steps to offer an explanation that was tailored to the specific complaint. Those explanations may or may not meet the consumer’s desired resolution.

The CFPB was created as part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act, which also authorized the bureau to make certain information about financial products and services public. The first online complaint database was launched in June 2012 for credit cards, and the database has since been expanded.

Records show complaints against Equifax have increased every year since the database went live, with almost 16,000 complaints in 2016 alone. This year should easily surpass that number.

Personal information in the CFPB’s complaint database is anonymized, and the bureau does not verify all the facts in each complaint, but it does contact companies for responses before it publishes them online. The database covers a broad range of financial products and services.

Each complaint also includes an optional field for “consumer narratives” that let people tell the specifics of their situation. It’s here that the widespread frustration with Equifax and its competitors comes into focus, with customers often regaling their dealings with the firms in grueling detail. “It’s been well over a year now, and I’m still battling with Equifax to review my statements and remove the remaining collection accounts,” reads one typical complaint.

The Equifax hack is being called one of the most serious in American history, exposing the personal information—including birth dates, addresses, and Social Security numbers—of more than 143 million U.S. consumers.

With Congress now getting involved, the extent to which lawmakers should excuse its past transgressions will likely become a topic of debate in the near future. But as Equifax’s frayed relationship with American consumers already shows, excuses won’t get you a clean slate.

But! Today we will be speaking again with Commander X of Anonymous, Author, Behind The Mask: An Inside Look At Anonymous
website: http://www.behindthemask.cf

X is also certain that the Russians were not responsible for Hillary’s Loss of the election.

Commander X’s sister was invaded by cops door kicked in, strapped to a bed and injected with drugs so she could rat out X. She doesn’t know where he is.

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